Lianne Milton

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Biography

American, 1976

Lianne Milton is an editorial and documentary photographer based in Brazil. Her work focuses on the effects of politics on people and their environments in places such as Southeast Asia, Latin America and the United States.

Lianne began her freelance career in 2009 with a project documenting the rise of Sharia law in Banda Aceh, Indonesia, as a consequence of the 2004 Tsunami. From 2009 to 2012 she focused her personal work on Southeast Asia and Latin America, exploring subjects such as food insecurity and the culture of violence in Guatemala, as well as drug addiction and the environmental impact of hydroelectric dams on ethnic minorities in Cambodia.

In 2015, Lianne was awarded the inaugural environmental photography award from the Yves Rocher Foundation. She is also a recipient of the 2013 PDN Photo Annual in the documentary category and received Latinamerican Photography Awards in 2012, 2013 and 2016. Her work on the Football World Cup protests in Rio de Janeiro were recognised in L’Espresso Magazine’s Pictures of the Year 2013.

She is a contributing photographer for the Washington Post and #everydaylatinamerica, one of the Everyday Projects. She also works for clients including CNN, Die Zeit, The Guardian, the Financial Times, M le Monde, Mother Jones Magazine, National Public Radio, New York Times, STAT, The Sunday Times, The Observer, Wall Street Journal and many others.

Her non-profit clients include the Ford Foundation, Hertz Foundation, Open Society Foundations, ActionAid, Smile Train, UNICEF and UN Women.

Lianne is currently living in Rio de Janeiro where the City meets the Ocean.

When she is not photographing, she's out surfing.

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Click here for a brief overview of Lianne Milton's work.


Indigenous Mayan Q’eqchi communities in eastern Guatemala’s Polochic Valley have long lived without state presence.


When the lower house of the Brazilian parliament voted to impeach President Dilma Rousseff on 17 April 2016, conservative congressman Jair Bolsonaro, a former army parachutist and a possible 2018 presidential candidate, dedicated his vote to the memory of Col.


The Dia de Yemenja (Day of Yemenja) is an annual event in the Brazilian city of Salvador de Bahia which coincides with the day dedicated to Our Lady of Seafaring (Nossa Senhora dos Navegantes) in the Catholic Church on the 2nd of February.


On 12 January 2010 southern Haiti was shaken by a 7.


In 2012, Medellin was voted the most innovative city in the world by the Wall Street Journal for its ‘social urbanism’ approach to regeneration and urban improvement.


Five years after a devastating earthquake that killed hundreds of thousands and flattened large parts of the Haitian capital, people continue to rebuild their lives.


With one of the highest homicide rates in the world, tiny Guatemala bears the brunt of the violence connected to Central America’s drug trade and a culture of impunity bred by decades of civil war.


Despite having the highest GDP in Central America, Guatemala also has the highest rate of chronic malnutrition which leads to physical stunting and retarded mental development, especially affecting the indigenous population.


In collaboration with Panos Pictures and the World Photography Organisation (WPO), Sony’s Global Imaging Ambassadors present a nine-month social documentary initiative called ‘FutureofCities’~~In collaboration with Panos Pictures and the World Photography Organisation (WPO), Sony’s Global Imaging Ambassadors (SGIA) present a nine-month social documentary initiative called FutureofCities.


In collaboration with Panos Pictures and the World Photography Organisation (WPO), Sony’s Global Imaging Ambassadors present a nine-month social documentary initiative called ‘FutureofCities’.


Rio’s oldest favela, established in 1897, has found itself at the centre of sweeping regeneration projects connected ot the World Cup and the upcoming Olympic Games.


In Rio’s sprawling shanty towns, a new experiment in community policing is slowly bearing fruit with increasing numbers of women joining the Police Pacification Units.